February 2010 Archives

Fact Follows Audio Book Fiction

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Extinction news from Rockford's Rock Opera audio book...

I spotted this on Discovery dot com and thought it was interesting - anything about extinct creatures living on an island catches my eye!              


When Hungarian baron Franz Nopcsa claimed that his sister in 1895 found bones belonging to dwarf dinosaurs on his family's Transylvanian estate, many thought his claims were false.

A new study not only confirms the existence of dwarf dinosaurs, but also explains how dinosaurs shrank during the late cretacious Infinity-like place -- Hateg Island, Romania -- where dinos never really grew up.

According to the study, which has been accepted for publication in the journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, the unusual phenomenon appears to have only affected some of the island's dinosaur residents.

"The other animals living with the dinosaurs were generally much smaller anyway, but so far haven't shown obvious size differences from mainland relatives," lead author Michael J. Benton told Discovery..

Benton, who directs the Palaeobiology and Biodiversity Research Group at the University of Bristol, and his colleagues conducted one of the most extensive studies yet on the Hateg Island dinosaur remains. They analyzed the dinosaurs' limb proportions and bone growth patterns, comparing them with those of mainland dinos.

The analysis determined that at least four of the Hateg dinosaurs were dwarves.

The diminutive dinosaurs included the titanosaurian sauropod Magyarosaurus, which had a body length of about 16 to 19 feet. That's impressive by human standards, but is miniature compared to a sauropod such as Argentinosaurus, which grew to be at least 82 feet long.

Another small dinosaur was the hadrosaurid Telmatosaurus. Its 13-foot-long body contrasted with the average size of other hadrosaurids, which were 23 to 33 feet long, according to Benton.

Two species of Zalmoxes dinosaurs also appear to have been dwarves, with one -- Zalmoxes robustus -- measuring about 10 feet in length.

"So these forms are all typically half the length of their close relatives on larger land masses, and this equates to a body mass of perhaps one-eighth that of the relatives," said Benton. "Body mass is what matters most in biological terms, such as physiology and food intake."

Magnified sections of the dinosaurs' bones revealed that the animals were adults and not juveniles. The scientists believe the dinosaurs likely shrank due to a process called progenesis, which shortens the developmental period. Sexual maturity happened early, and these dinosaurs may have also died two to five years younger than their "normal"-sized counterparts.

"This in-depth study by Benton and colleagues is both fascinating and provocative," paleontologist Scott Sampson, a research curator at the Utah Museum of Natural History, told Discovery News, "demonstrating that the largest group of animals ever to walk the earth included dwarfed varieties."

Sampson added that the study also supports "the more general 'island rule'-- the idea that, when marooned on islands, evolution tends to make large animals smaller, and small animals larger."

Scientists continue to debate why this happens on islands. Reduced supplies of food, smaller ranges, and few larger predators have all been theorized.

"I think most biologists accept that there is something going on, and that the island rule has validity," Benton said.

For more great stuff like this visit Discovery News and to hear Rockford's Rock Opera visit here!

Apologies for a shameless plug but, in some cases, this Blog has proved the best way to meet new fans for Rockford's Rock Opera, the amazing new audio visual adventure for children and adults.

With songs, music videos and a great audio story Rockford's Rock Opera is like nothing else. And, in the true spirit of free children's online adventure stories, Part One of the story (a whole hour long) is absolutely free. Just click on Rockford's Rock Opera and you can see and hear for yourself. Whether you're a teacher (we have lots of free nature teaching and educational resources - lesson plans, ICT materials etc) or a parent, Rockford's Rock Opera provides a thought provoking and safe site full of useful information about nature, extinction and ecology.

SInce 2009 Rockford's Rock Opera has been streamed or downloaded by over 1,000,000 people around the world so, please, click on any of the links above and find out for yourself.

Hope you enjoy it! (Normal Blogging service will be resumed shortly!)
I know, I know. It's February and this is my first Rockford's Rock Opera Children's Audio Book Blog of the year!

Still, we've been busy and I hope you'll forgive us. Last week we had another sell out live show at the fantastic Bull Theatre in Barnet. It really was a great night - thanks to everyone, especially the children from Foulds School and the Susi Earnshaw Theatre School - who made it such a special occasion.

We've also been witnessing the rise and rise in popularity of our free children's audio book app - Rockford's Rock Opera on the iPhone! We really haven't publicised it at all (other than on the website) but we're now doing 100s of downloads a day from all over the world.

Everyone seems to love the format, although we have had some comments that it 'doesn't employ all the functionality of the iPhone'. That's true of course but then again, it wasn't conceived as an APP. It's really an enhanced audio book story with videos, music and pictures and, as such, its wonderful. It is also quite large - 200meg - so it does need to be downloaded via WiFi.

Still it's a FREE enhanced audio book! And it's Rockford's Rock Opera! So what more do you want?!

There will be more - more interesting - news soon. But for the time being, I have blogged in 2010 and that's an achievement in itself!




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